Art Club Bangladesh

Fine Art Gallery exhibiting works of art from B’desh & SAARC countries

Archive for the ‘india’ Category

Denise’s dream-world of earthy colours

Posted by Osman on August 7, 2007

Blending the old with the new
Fayza HaqPicture
Art works by Denise Hudon

Denise Hudon, who lives and works in Bangladesh, had an exhibition of her works at Art Club Bangladesh recently. One was acquainted with her work by her exhibition at Alliance Francaise last year. She grows her own dyes in her kitchen garden and uses material like the veins of banana leaves for her canvas. Her colours are muted — madder, brown and beige. In them she puts block prints and paints swirls of paisley and alpona. She combines the art of the west with what she has learned from Africa, and now she mixes it with Subcontinental designs and motifs found in calligraphy and sari anchal designs. Her hues are so muted that they appear dream-like. In her work is a subtle combination of the east and west. She calls her exhibition “Reviving traditional arts into contemporary form”.Born in the heart of French Canada, with some native Red Indian blood in her veins, she uses flora as her subject. She painted murals during her formal education in fine arts. Later she entered ceramic sculpting. After that, for 15 years, she taught painting and ceramics. Even when she was in Canada in the eighties she used dried fibres of bamboo stalks discovered in the Chinese district and waste material recovered from store-room of shops in St Hubert Street. Earlier she had used recycled rag paper and cement bags. Learning from African artists in Togo, Ghana and Mali, she took to using vegetable fibres, like banana leaves, cabbage and leeks, in a big way. We see her close relationship with nature in her earthy tones. She uses dyes that she has collected from all over the world and from her garden. There is something both singular and universal in her work.

Her Gulshan has used bamboo, cotton and paper for the base. The dyes include n’pekou and galama. In the composition we see an embossed blossom in greyish white, set on a background of chocolate coloured squares. This is again placed on a burnt sienna rectangle. Autumn is done on paper made from cotton and bamboo. Safflower has been used for the dying and it brings large, delicate brown leaves that appear as if dusted over with powdered sugar. At the sides are rectangles dotted with motifs made from the fine central veins of tiny leaves.

Twilight zone is made from frangipani, cassia and fistula dyes. On a black base is a paisley pattern with flowers and leaves. The other motif is a matching piece in rich brown, and it appears somewhat abstract. Manuscript has delicate floral patterns backed with neat geometrical motifs. A chapter has papers of corn leaves and cotton for the base, while the dyes in it include black, indigo and marigold. We see an open book mounted on a pale beige backdrop. In the book itself we see intriguing characters. Motifs in indigo decorate the pages and a ribbon appears to run down the centre of the book.

Denise has exhibited in numerous places like Africa, Canada, Cambodia, Indonesia and Pakistan. She has taught in Canada and abroad.

Posted in abstract, Africa, art, art club, Artist, bangla, bangladesh, Bangladeshi Artists, Bengal, blog, Canadian High Commision, Contemporary Art, culture, Denise Hudon Arsenault, Dhaka Art Scene, Ecology, fine arts, gallery, india, natural dyes, Natural materials, Nomad at heart & soul, society, Unicef, visual arts | Leave a Comment »

Art & Culture

Posted by Osman on July 6, 2007

Art & Culture

Bangladesh is a melting pot of races. She, therefore, has a mixed culture. Her deep rooted heritage is amply reflected in her architecture, literature, dance, drama, music and painting. Bangladeshi culture is influenced by three great religions- Hinduism, Buddhism and Islam in successive order, with Islam having the most pervading and lasting impact. Like a colorful montage, the cultural tradition of the country is a happy blending of many variants, unique in diversity but in essence greatly symmetrical.

Festivals:
A series of
festivals varying from race to race are observed here. Some of the Muslim rites are Eid-e-Miladunnabi, Eid-ul-Fitr, Eid-ul-Azha, Muharram etc. Hindus observe Durga Puja, Saraswati Puja, Kali Puja and many other pujas.  Christmas ( popularly called Baradin in Bangla ) is observed by Christians. Also there are some common festivities, which are observed countrywide  by people irrespective of races. Pahela Baishakh (the first day of Bangla year) is such a festival. National festivals are Independence Day (26th March), 21st February (the National Mourning Day and World Mother Language Day), The Victory Day (16th December), Rabindra & Nazrul Jayanti etc. 

 

 Rabindranath Tagore

Literature:
Bangalees have a rich literary heritage. The earliest available specimen of Bengali literature is about a thousand years old. During the mediaeval period. Bengali Literature developed considerably with the patronage of Muslim rulers. Chandi Das, Daulat Kazi and Alaol are some of the famous poets of the period. The era of modern Bengali Literature began in the late nineteenth century
Rabindranath Tagore, the Nobel Laureate is a vital part of Bangalee culture.  Kazi Nazrul Islam, Michael Madhusudan Datta. Sarat Chandra Chattopadhaya, Bankim Chandra Chattopadhaya, Mir Mosharraf Hossain and Kazi Ahdul Wadud are the pioneers of modern Bengali Literature.

  Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in art, art club, art of writing, Artist, bangla, bangladesh, Bangladeshi Artists, Bengal, blog, Calcutta, Deshi Sites, festival, fine arts, gallery, happening, india, society, west bengal | 5 Comments »

KHUNTI KADAI

Posted by Osman on June 27, 2007

Khunti Kadai of Anglo Indian dishes with Nahid & Shawkat Osman
Friday 12:30 p.m. on Tara Newz
Anglo Indian recipes by Shawkat Osman of Bangladesh
This Week Chinese Menu

A highly popular cookery programme conducted by Shawkat Osman featuring
exotic recipes.

E-mail Address : shawkat1950@yahoo.com

This Week Chinese recipes

 

Posted in art, art club, bangladesh, Bangladeshi Artists, Bengal, blog, Calcutta, cooking, culinary, culinary arts, culture, Deshi Sites, food, happening, india, Khunti Kadai, society | 3 Comments »

Serving Bangla bites

Posted by Osman on June 27, 2007

| Wednesday, April 13, 2005 The TelegraphServing Bangla bites
 
 
 
(From top) Bangladeshi culinary experts Saukat and Nahid Osman at Sonargaon; Pictures by Rashbehari Das

Flavours from across the eastern borders have wafted into the Sonargaon with the ongoing Bangladeshi food festival. Under the able guidance of culinary experts Saukat and Nahid Osman, authentic Bangladeshi recipes have been cooked up to celebrate Poila Baisakh with a 10-day food fiesta, ending April 17.

?Poila Baisakh is celebrated on a grand scale in Bangladesh. Starting at 5 am, the streets fill up and everyone is out to have a good time through song and dance, and especially food. Without the specially-cooked Ilish, no festival can ever be complete,? said Nahid.

?Cooking, eating and drinking are my passions. My mother and mother-in-law are excellent cooks. In fact, when I got married, my mother was rather worried that I might starve. Though my wife started her culinary journey as a novice, today she?s a better cook than both of them!? added Saukat.

Nahid?s first official culinary visit to India was for a Bengali cooking show at the Hilton Hotel in Mumbai. ?The response was tremendous, with people queuing up to take tips. One of the people who used our recipes was Tarla Dalal,? she said.

Speaking on the differences in Bangla and Bengali cooking, she explained how posto (poppy seeds) is very popular in Calcutta, while in Bangladesh it?s sesame seeds.

With an extensive menu laid out for the festival, one can start with a Bhorhani (whisked yoghurt spiced with ginger, mustard and other spices) or Matha (whisked yoghurt diluted with water and seasoned). The Aalu Cheese Chop, Golda Chingri Chita Bhaji (shrimps cooked with red chilli paste and garlic) and Ilish Tikka (hilsa meatballs) are good options.

Progressing to the main course, the Enchor (green jackfruit cooked in garam masala and ghee), Lebu dal (masur dal with paneer and lemon rind) and Potol Dolma Jhol (pointed gourd stuffed with spicy paneer) are sure to appeal to vegetarians.

For fish and meat lovers, the Dhakaiya Golda (river prawn cooked in hot masala), Chital Khari (meat extracted from the hump of the chital fish) and Shorshe Mangsho (mutton cooked with yoghurt, mustard paste, green chilli, salt and garlic) are must-tries. A number of interesting vegetarian and non-vegetarian thalis are also available.

To round off the meal on a sweet note, one can choose from the Gur Payesh (pounded aromatic rice cooked with date molasses and thickened milk), Dudh Puya (rice cake cooked with milk solids, honey and milk) and Zarda Shemai (vermicelli cooked in ghee and garam masala).

Posted in art, art club, bangladesh, Bangladeshi Artists, Bengal, blog, Celebration, cooking, culinary, culinary arts, culture, food, happening, india, society, Tarla Dalal, tour | 1 Comment »

Contrasts in Culture reflecting on the Canvasses

Posted by Osman on March 15, 2007

 Art Club Bangladesh Fine Arts Gallery Presents:

Arabic Calligraphy & Moghul Miniatures

Calligraphy Exhibition by renowned Pakistani Artist Arif Khan

Moghul Miniatures by

Kulshum Wasti

&

Khalid Saeed Bhatt

both famous Artists &  University Educators from Pakistan…

Art Club Gallery  is located at Suite # 3B; House # 4; Road # 104; Gulshan 2…Dhaka- Bangladesh

Posted in art, art club, Artist, bangladesh, Calligraphy, culture, fine arts, gallery, happening, india, nepal, pakistan | Leave a Comment »