Art Club Bangladesh

Fine Art Gallery exhibiting works of art from B’desh & SAARC countries

Archive for the ‘Expressionism’ Category

Buoyant colours of a brave heart

Posted by Osman on August 7, 2007

Anisur Rahman’s solo exhibition
Fayza HaqPicture
Churiwali (Left) and Rhythm-2 by Anisur Rahman

Anisur Rahman’s solo exhibition at Art Club Bangladesh proves once again that an indomitable spirit can conquer physical limitations. Despite numerous operations on his brain and the fact that his right side had become paralysed, the artist has ventured into a laudable effort. Through lines, forms, textures and colours he has overcome his handicap and delighted his viewers with the flat-brush-strokes of his bright colours. He is deeply engrossed in human aspirations and dreams, which he expresses through his restless strokes and vivid colours. There are 48 entries at the exhibit.Artist Rafiqun Nabi says about Rahman’s work, “Anisur Rahman is a senior painter and my contemporary. He has taken human figures as his subjects. Anis has his own style and is not governed by techniques. His colour compositions are definitely laudable.”

Nahid Osman the curator of the gallery adds, “This exhibition features illustrations of day to day accounts from the artist’s diary. The feelings generated by his tormented sub-consciousness are depicted through the works of art. Through sheer determination, he has trained his left hand to continue with his work with perseverance. Anis finds the work therapeutic and through his hard work he re-establishes himself.”

“Most of my paintings are based on rhythm, hence I call the exhibition Rhythm of the Soul. The works are figurative with semi-abstract presentation. I use acrylic, as oil is difficult for me to handle. However, I try to retain the effect of oil,” says Anis.

On the Stage depicts a couple of thespians, done in red, brown, blue, black and green. Another piece shows how elder sisters look after their siblings. It has bright colours and quick brush strokes with circular lines and dots. Spring-2 brings in beauty of nature around. Gossiping shows women, some standing and some sitting, talking to their hearts content. Bright colours, once again are set off by dramatic black.

Fisherman shows a villager with a bright gamchha tied around his head. Untitled has suggestions of a face and a figure, with loud splashes of orange, yellow and blue.

Churiwali features a woman with a basket of bangles on her head. Her sari has a layer of net used as collage — which lends interest to the texture — and behind her are the barges where the gypsies live. The dominant hues are orange and yellow with splashes of green and black. Composition-4 brings in suggestions of flowers of different colours. Fallen Bird is a poignant image with splashes of blood.

Anisur Rahman has had exhibitions held in Pakistan and France. The artist has taken part in National and Asian Biennale exhibitions.

The exhibition ends on August 10.

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Rhythm of the Soul- Anisur Rahman

Posted by Osman on August 3, 2007

Art Club Bangladesh is elated to present “Rhythm of the Soul” by contemporary artist Anisur Rahman starting on Friday the 3rd of August, 2007. The exhibition will be inaugurated by Aly Zaker, Actor & Advertising Mogul & Rafiqun Nabi, renowned contemporary artist & cartoonist, will be present as Special Guest & will comment on the life & work of the Artist. The Exhibition will be open for all from 11am – 8pm, everyday till the 10th of August @ The Art Club Bangladesh Fine Art Gallery, House # 4; Road # 104; Suite 3B; Gulshan 2.

Posted in abstract, Anisur Rahman, art, art club, Artist, bangla, bangladesh, Bangladeshi Artists, Bengal, blog, culture, Deshi Sites, Dhaka Art Scene, Expressionism, figurative, fine arts, gallery, Rafiqun Nabi, society | Leave a Comment »

“The Rhythm of the Soul”

Posted by Osman on August 3, 2007

The poet weaves poems with the aid of words & alphabets. Whereas a painter expresses the poetry in his soul with the aid of forms, line, texture & colour. “Rhythm of the Soul” is this poet’s rendition of his struggle in expressing the vibrations in his environment that moved his soul, through brush strokes & colour.  The poet, namely Anisur Rahman has come of age with his 5th Solo titled “Rhythm of the Soul”. Through sheer determination & undaunted vigour Anisur has conquered his disability. Formerly, he used to adorn canvases with his right hand before his tragic accident that paralyzed the right side of his body. He trained his left hand to continue with his work only with the ammunition of his perseverance & resolve. He has composed 45 of his works for this exhibit with that same vigour & energy to prove his tenacity & vibrant life force to win against all odds. Anisur found painting therapeutic & through sincere hard work & zeal has re-established himself at the same platform he was recognized before tragedy engulfed his life.

 This exhibition is nothing but illustrations of accounts of the day-to-day, life-like pages of his own diary. The feelings generated by his tormented sub-consciousness are depicted through these works of art. The subject is very coherent with the various techniques & the bright colours. The random & loose usage of an array of flat-brush-strokes with a prism of colours is the key point of consistency in the confused & chaos inflicted world. He has tried to make a peaceful aura in incessant perplexity. The hints at abstract & semi realistic figures used in the background of mostly different non-chromatic colours are the main characters in his works of art. The usual scenes of rural, urban life & nostalgic boyhood scenes are depicted in ‘ the jumping fish at night’, ‘time frame’, ‘happy fisherman’, ‘churi wala, ‘model girl’, ‘gossiping’ & ‘baul’, etc. These are common subjects that this poets has drawn inspiration from & presented in his own, unique rendition. He draws inspiration from Mother Nature & also ‘Man’ in ‘his’ true essence. Anisur seems to be a captive bird struggling to escape its cage & fly free into the great wide open, carefree. Thus, a kind of impatient restlessness is marked in his creation that is strongly revealed & expressed through his work with ease. He is deeply absorbed into the human aspirations, hopes & dreams against prevailing odds & inequities but ultimately becomes successful & wins the races triumphantly. That is the joy of a creative man as he always intends to be.

by

Nahid Osman

Posted in abstract, Anisur Rahman, art, art club, Artist, bangla, bangladesh, Bangladeshi Artists, Bengal, blog, Contemporary Art, culture, Dhaka Art Scene, Expressionism, fine arts, gallery, happening, society, visual arts | 2 Comments »

Abstract Expressionism

Posted by Osman on March 21, 2007

“A term first used in connection with Kandinsky in 1919, but more commonly associated with post-war American art. Robert Coates, an American critic, coined it in 1946, referring to Gorky, Pollock and de Kooning. By the 1951 Museum of Modern Art exhibition ‘Abstract Painting and Sculpture in America’, the term was used to refer to all types of non-geometric abstraction. There are two distinct groups within the movement: Colour Field artists (Rothko, Newman, Still) worked with simple, unified blocks of colour; and gestural painters like Pollock, De Kooning and Hofmann who made use of Surrealist techniques of automatic art. Not all the artists associated with the term produced either purely abstract, or purely Expressionist work: Harold Rosenburg preferred the phrase Action Painting, whilst Greenberg used the less specific ‘American Type Painting’, and because of the concentration of artists in New York, they are also known as the New York School. The only real connection between Abstract Expressionists was in their artistic philosophy, and publications like Tiger’s Eye, an avant-garde magazine that helped spread their ideas. All were influenced by Existentialist ideas, which emphasized the importance of the act of creating, not of the finished object. Most had a Surrealist background, inspired by the presence of Breton, Masson and Matta in New York in the 1940s and by retrospectives on Miró (1941) and Kandinsky (1945), and the Abstract Expressionists sought to express their subconscious through their art. They also shared an interest in Jung’s ideas on myth, ritual and memory (inspired by exhibitions of African and American Indian art in 1935 and 1941 respectively) and conceived an almost Romantic view of the artist, seeing their painting as a way of life and themselves as disillusioned commentators on contemporary society after the Depression and the Second World War. Other American artists associated with the movement were Motherwell, Tobey, Kline and Philip Guston.”

– From “The Bulfinch Guide to Art History”

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